About ACL/CCL

Step 2: About ACL/CCL

The cranial cruciate ligament (CCL), equivalent to the anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL in people, is responsible for limiting hyperextension of the stifle, limiting internal rotation of the tibia in relation to the femur, and to prevent forward sliding/drawer motion of the tibia in relation to the femur. Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) is the most common cause of hind limb lameness in dogs.

The underlying cause of CCLR in the majority of dogs is different than ACL injuries in most people. Whereas trauma is a common cause of ACL tears in people, CCLR in dogs is typically degenerative in nature. Some proposed predisposing factors for cruciate injuries in dogs include genetics, obesity, and poor fitness level, early neutering, excessive tibial plateau slope (TPS), immune-mediated disease, and bacterial presence within the joint. Young to middle-aged, female, large breed dogs are at greatest risk for tearing their CCL, though any dog can develop a CCLR. However, as with ACL tears in people, acute traumatic ruptures can also occur.

Though the underlying cause of the disease may be different in each dog, the anatomy of the joint may play a role in the continued breakdown of the ligament. Due to the slope of the top of the tibia, or the tibial plateau, the cranial cruciate ligament of the dog is under stress during weight bearing as it attempts to keep the femur and the tibia in appropriate alignment. Once the integrity of the ligament is compromised, the tibia begins to move forward in relation to the femur during weight bearing. There is some evidence that the steeper the tibial plateau slope, the greater the likelihood of a dog developing a CCLR. The instability that develops is partly responsible for the pain present in dogs with this injury. As the cruciate ligament tears, changes are also taking place in the joint leading to a loss of cartilage health early on and a complete loss of cartilage in end-stage arthritis. In most patients, once the degenerative process of the CCL begins, the ligament will go on to a complete tear.

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OUR CLIENTS

"My dogs and I had a great experience at [TPLO Chicago]. I felt very confident they were in the best of hands! Dr. Gendreau is a true "veterin" with his "specialty" and 40+ years of experience. His new facility is outstanding. All state of the art equipment and his system "Indigo Clean" for maximum sanitation and maintaining a germ free environment is reassuring against harmful bacteria, causing infections. It was a convenient, positive, successful experience. He's the best!"

- Jodi

"My 8 1/2 year old English bulldog needed tplo surgery for over a year. After contemplating putting him through [the tplo surgery with TPLO Chicago] we eventually decided it was the best thing to do. Dr. Gendreau called me the night after the surgery and the next day to see how zeppelin was and handling pain meds. I cannot say enough about how well the surgery recovery and overall well-being of zeppelin has been. If your concerned about putting your dog through the surgery the amount of time you think about it will be greater than it will be for them to be moving better again. The first 3 days are hard but after the most difficult part is keeping him from doing things he couldn’t do before (stairs, walks, jumping on the couch,). After the 8 weeks it’s nice to see him back to normal."

- Richard

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